2016-09-12

New Findings From the MIDUS Study: Chronic Disease at Midlife Do Parent-child Bonds Modify the Effect of Childhood SES?

New Findings From the MIDUS Study:
Chronic Disease at Midlife
Do Parent-child Bonds Modify the Effect of Childhood SES?
Matthew A. Andersson

Journal of Health and Social Behavior September 2016 vol. 57 no. 3 373-389
doi: 10.1177/0022146516661596

Abstract

Childhood socioeconomic status (SES) often is associated with physical health even decades later. However, parent-child emotional bonds during childhood may modify the importance of childhood SES to emergent health inequalities across the life course. Drawing on national data on middle-aged adults (1995 and 2005 National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States; MIDUS; Ns = 2,746 and 1,632), I find that compromised parent-child bonds eliminate the association between childhood SES and midlife disease. Longitudinal models of incident disease across one decade show that childhood abuse in particular continues to undermine the health protection associated with childhood SES. When childhood SES is moderate to high, compromised parent-child bonds lead to no predicted health benefits from childhood SES. In total, these findings direct attention to parent-child bonds as social-psychological levers for the transmission of class-based health advantages.

MIDUS is available from #AgingData at NACDA
http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/series/203