2016-08-30

New findings from the Social Environment and Biomarkers of Aging Study (SEBAS) in Taiwan, 2000 and 2006 (ICPSR 3792) in PLOS ONE


      Relative Handgrip Strength Is a Simple Indicator of Cardiometabolic Risk among Middle-Aged and Older People: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan
      By: Wei-Ju Lee, Li-Ning Peng, Shu-Ti Chiou, Liang-Kung Chen 
      Published: August 25, 2016http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0160876
          http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0160876
          Abstract
          Background
          Muscle strength may play an important role in cardiovascular health. The study was intended to evaluate the association between cardiometabolic risk, risk of coronary artery disease and handgrip strength by using the relative handgrip strength.
          Materials and Methods
          Data of 927 Taiwanese aged 53 years and older (510 men and 417 women) were retrieved from a nationwide representative population-based cohort cross-sectional study in 2006. All participants were interviewed face-to-face and received measures of anthropometry, dominant handgrip strength, relative handgrip strength (summation of both handgrip strength divided by body mass index) and serum biomarkers.
          Results
          Multivariate linear regression analysis showed the significant association between relative handgrip strength and favorable cardiometabolic risk factors including blood pressure, triglyceride, total cholesterol to high density cholesterol(HDL-C) ratio, glycohemoglobin (HbA1c), uric acid, Framingham risk score in men, and HDL-C, fasting glucose, HbA1c, log hsCRP in women. Dominant hand grip strength was only associated with log hsCRP in women. (p<0.05 for all), but was not significant associated with all cardiovascular biomarkers and FRS in both sex.
          Conclusions
          Joint with handgrip strength and body size, as relative handgrip strength, may be a better tool to capture conceptual concomitant health, which may be a simple, inexpensive, and easy-to-use tool when targeting cardiovascular health in public health level.

          Information on how to obtain SEBAS data for research purposes can be obtained from NACDA at: 
          Persistent URL: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR03792.v7   


2016-08-29

New Releases through 2016-08-28

Below is a list of new data collection additions to the ICPSR data archive along with a list of released data collections that have been updated:

New Additions

Updates


American Identity and Representation Survey, 2012 (ICPSR 36410)

This survey was designed to investigate whether having psychological connections to particular groups (ex: racial, ethnic, and national origin groups) and perceptions of discrimination lead to alienation from the structure and operation of representative democracy in the United States. The data allow for comparative ethnic analyses of people's views regarding the representative-constituent relationship and of the conditions under which group identifications and perceptions of discrimination matter.
The survey includes oversamples of Black, Latino, and Asian respondents. A Spanish version of the survey was available.
Variables focusing on respondent perceived representation in the United States include political ideology and political party affiliation.

2016-08-26

Galveston Bay Recovery Study, 2008-2010 (ICPSR 34801)

The Galveston Bay Recovery Study (GBRS) was designed to study trajectories of wellness after Hurricane Ike hit the Galveston Bay area on September 13, 2008. The sample included adults who were living in Galveston County or Chambers County, Texas at the time of the hurricane, not just those who remained in the area after the hurricane, who may have been less affected by the storm. Three interviews were conducted approximately 2-5, 5-9, and 14-18 months after the hurricane, respectively. Information was obtained on experiences during Hurricane Ike, lifetime traumatic events, and mental health and functioning before and after the hurricane, as well as between survey waves (including assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and suicidality). Demographic variables include race/ethnicity, age, education, marital status, number of children/offspring, income, and employment status.

Persistent URL: 

Click here to explore variables



2016-08-22

New Releases through 2016-08-21

Below is a list of new data collection additions to the ICPSR data archive along with a list of released data collections that have been updated:

New Additions

Updates


2016-08-16

New Findings From the MIDUS Study: What Explains the Heritability of Completed Fertility? Evidence from Two Large Twin Studies

New Findings From the MIDUS Study:
What Explains the Heritability of Completed Fertility? Evidence from Two Large Twin Studies

In: Behavior Genetics

Daniel A. Briley, Felix C. Tropf, Melinda C. Mills

Original Research: 13 August 2016
DOI: 10.1007/s10519-016-9805-3

Abstract
In modern societies, individual differences in completed fertility are linked with genotypic differences between individuals. Explaining the heritability of completed fertility has been inconclusive, with alternative explanations centering on family formation timing, pursuit of education, or other psychological traits. We use the twin subsample from the Midlife Development in the United States study and the TwinsUK study to examine these issues. In total, 2606 adult twin pairs reported on their completed fertility, age at first birth and marriage, level of education, Big Five personality traits, and cognitive ability. Quantitative genetic Cholesky models were used to partition the variance in completed fertility into genetic and environmental variance that is shared with other phenotypes and residual variance. Genetic influences on completed fertility are strongly related to family formation timing and less strongly, but significantly, with psychological traits. Multivariate models indicate that family formation, demographic, and psychological phenotypes leave no residual genetic variance in completed fertility in either dataset. Results are largely consistent across U.S. and U.K. sociocultural contexts.

Cite this article as:
Briley, D.A., Tropf, F.C. & Mills, M.C. Behav Genet (2016). doi:10.1007/s10519-016-9805-3

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10519-016-9805-3

MIDUS is available from ‪#‎AgingData‬ at NACDA
http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/series/203


New Findings From the MIDUS Study: Culture and Healthy Eating The Role of Independence and Interdependence in the United States and Japan

New Findings From the MIDUS Study: Culture and Healthy Eating- The Role of Independence and Interdependence in the United States and Japan
Cynthia S. Levine, Yuri Miyamoto, Hazel Rose Markus, Attilio Rigotti, Jennifer Morozink Boylan, Jiyoung Park, Shinobu Kitayama, Mayumi Karasawa, Norito Kawakami, Christopher L. Coe, Gayle D. Love, Carol D. Ryff

Published online August 11, 2016, doi: 10.1177/0146167216658645 Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
August 11, 2016 0146167216658645

Abstract Healthy eating is important for physical health. Using large probability samples of middle-aged adults in the United States and Japan, we show that fitting with the culturally normative way of being predicts healthy eating. In the United States, a culture that prioritizes and emphasizes independence, being independent predicts eating a healthy diet (an index of fish, protein, fruit, vegetables, reverse-coded sugared beverages, and reverse-coded high fat meat consumption; Study 1) and not using nonmeat food as a way to cope with stress (Study 2a). In Japan, a culture that prioritizes and emphasizes interdependence, being interdependent predicts eating a healthy diet (Studies 1 and 2b). Furthermore, reflecting the types of agency that are prevalent in each context, these relationships are mediated by autonomy in the United States and positive relations with others in Japan. These findings highlight the importance of understanding cultural differences in shaping healthy behavior and have implications for designing health-promoting interventions. http://psp.sagepub.com/…/20…/08/11/0146167216658645.abstract MIDUS is available from ‪#‎AgingData‬ at NACDA http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/series/203





2016-08-15

New Releases through 2016-08-14

Below is a list of new data collection additions to the ICPSR data archive along with a list of released data collections that have been updated:

New Additions

Updates


2016-08-12

NACDA Announces the BETA Release: Survey of Midlife Development in Japan (MIDJA 2): Biomarker Project, 2013-2014 (ICPSR 36530)

NACDA Announces the BETA Release:

Survey of Midlife Development in Japan (MIDJA 2): Biomarker Project, 2013-2014 (ICPSR 36530)

Alternate Title: MIDJA 2 Biomarker

Principal Investigator(s): Ryff, Carol D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kawakami, Norito, University of Tokyo; Kitayama, Shinobu, University of Michigan; Karasawa, Mayumi, Tokyo Christian Woman's University; Markus, Hazel, Stanford University; Coe, Christopher, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Summary:

These data are being released in BETA version to facilitate early access to the study for research purposes. This collection has not been fully processed by NACDA or ICPSR at this time, and are released in the format provided by the principal investigators; users can find the data and documentation by clicking the "Other" link under the "Dataset(s), download:" area below. As the study is processed and given enhanced features by ICPSR, users will be contacted and can request the updated versions of the study. Please report any data errors or problems to user support and we will work with you to resolve any data related issues.

In 2008, with funding from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), baseline survey data were collected from a probability sample of Japanese adults (N=1,027) aged 30 to 79 from the Tokyo metropolitan area, resulting in the Survey of Midlife Development in Japan (MIDJA) [ICPSR 30822]. In 2009-2010, biomarker data was obtained from a subset (n=382) of these cases (MIDJA Biomarker) [ICPSR 34969].

The survey and biomarker measures obtained, parallel those in a national longitudinal sample of Americans known as Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) [ICPSR 4652: MIDUS 2 and ICPSR 2760: MIDUS 1]. The central objective was to compare the Japanese sample (MIDJA) with the United States sample (MIDUS) to test hypotheses about the role of psychosocial factors in the health (broadly defined) of mid- and later-life adults in Japan and the United States

In 2012, with additional support from NIA, a longitudinal follow-up of the MIDJA sample was conducted resulting in a second wave (N=657) of survey data (MIDJA 2) [ICPSR 36427].

This collection reflects data from 2013-2014, when a second wave of biomarker data was obtained from a sub-sample (n=328) of those who completed the MIDJA 2 survey. Among this group, about 75 percent (n=243) also completed the first wave of biomarker assessments.

Participants traveled to a clinic on the University of Tokyo campus where biomarker data (vital signs, morphometric assessments, blood assays, and medication data) were obtained. Participants also provided daily saliva samples for cortisol assessment and completed a self-administered medical history questionnaire, as well as a time preference questionnaire.

The medical history questionnaire included assessments of conditions and symptoms, major health and life events, nutrition/diet, and additional psychosocial measures (anxiety, depression, relationship quality, control etc.).

The time preference questionnaire was used to collect respondents' opinions on management of money and assets given hypothetical scenarios.

Demographic variables include age, gender, and marital status.

Series: Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) Series

These data can be obtained from NACDA:
Persistent URL: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36530.v1

Beta Release: Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (HEPESE) Wave 7 available from NACDA

Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (HEPESE) Wave 7, 2010-2011 [Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas] (ICPSR 36537)

Alternate Title:  HEPESE Wave 7
Principal Investigator(s): 
Summary:
These data are being released in BETA version to facilitate early access to the study for research purposes. This collection has not been fully processed by NACDA or ICPSR at this time; the original materials provided by the principal investigator were only converted to other file types for ease of use. As the study is processed and given enhanced features by ICPSR, users will be able to access the updated versions of the study. Please report any data errors or problems to user support and we will work with you to resolve any data related issues.
The Hispanic EPESE provides data on risk factors for mortality and morbidity in Mexican Americans in order to contrast how these factors operate differently in non-Hispanic White Americans, African Americans, and other major ethnic groups.
The Wave 7 dataset comprises the sixth follow-up of the baseline Hispanic EPESE (HISPANIC ESTABLISHED POPULATIONS FOR THE EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF THE ELDERLY, 1993-1994: [ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND TEXAS] [ICPSR 2851]). The baseline Hispanic EPESE collected data on a representative sample of community-dwelling Mexican Americans, aged 65 years and older, residing in the five southwestern states of Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas.
The public-use data cover demographic characteristics (age, sex, type of Hispanic race, income, education, marital status, number of children, employment, and religion), height, weight, social and physical functioning, chronic conditions, related health problems, health habits, self-reported use of dental, hospital, and nursing home services, and depression. Subsequent follow-ups provide a cross-sectional examination of the predictors of mortality, changes in health outcomes, and institutionalization, and other changes in living arrangements, as well as changes in life situations and quality of life issues.
During this 7th Wave (dataset 1), 2010-2011, re-interviews were conducted either in person or by proxy, with 659 of the original respondents. This Wave also includes 419 re-interviews from the additional sample of Mexican Americans aged 75 years and over with higher average-levels of education than those of the surviving cohort who were added in Wave 5, increasing the total number of respondents to 1,078.
The Wave 7 Informant Interviews dataset (dataset 2) includes data which corresponds to the sixth follow-up of the baseline Hispanic EPESE Wave 7 and included re-interviews with 1,078 Mexican Americans aged 80 years and older. During these interviews, participants were asked to provide the name and contact information of the person they are "closer to" or they "depend on the most for help." These INFORMANTS were contacted and interviewed regarding the health, function, social situation, finances, and general well-being of the ongoing Hispanic EPESE respondents. Information was also collected on the informant's health, function, and caregiver responsibilities and burden. This dataset includes information from 925 informants, more than two-thirds of whom were children of the respective respondents.

2016-08-10

Register for the upcoming webinar on: The National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) Aug 11, 2016 at 2:00 PM

Register for the upcoming webinar on:
The National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP): Overview and selected findings about olfaction and sleep
Join us for a webinar on Aug 11, 2016 at 2:00 PM EDT.
Register now!
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/regist…/4966234914106117633
The National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) is a longitudinal study of health and social factors among community-dwelling Americans born between 1920 and 1947 as well as a cohort comparison of baby-boomers born 1948-1965. Two waves (2005 and 2010) of data have been collected, with a third wave (2015) currently in the field. In 2005-06, 3,005 in-home interviews were collected, and in 2010-11, the initial respondents were reinterviewed, along with their spouses or cohabiting romantic partners, 3,377 interviews. When completed in 2015-16, the surviving participants and their partners will have been reinterviewed, and the new “baby boomer” cohort added (individuals born 1948-1965 and their spouses or partners), about 4,600 interviews.

New Findings From the MIDUS Study: Vigilance at home: Longitudinal analyses of neighborhood safety perceptions and health

New Findings From the MIDUS Study:
Vigilance at home: Longitudinal analyses of neighborhood safety perceptions and health
Jennifer W. Robinettea, Susan T. Charlesb, Tara L. Gruenewalda
Highlights
• Men and women reporting lower neighborhood safety have more health problems after 10 years.
• This relation persists across wide ranges of age and socioeconomic status.
• This relation is partially explained by smoking.
Abstract
Feeling unsafe in one's neighborhood is associated with poor health. This relation may be conferred through multiple pathways, including greater psychological distress and health behaviors that are associated with poorer health and perceptions of neighborhood safety. Women and older adults often report feeling less safe in their environments despite having a lower risk of victimization than men and younger adults, and it is unclear whether these differences influence the health-perception relationship. We used the Midlife in the United States study to test whether baseline neighborhood safety perceptions would be associated with chronic health conditions 10 years later, and whether this relation differs by gender, age, and individual and neighborhood SES. Chronic health conditions included items such as respiratory problems, cancer, autoimmune disorders, digestive problems, pain, infections, cardiovascular conditions, sleep problems, and depression and anxiety. Results indicated that people who perceived lower neighborhood safety had more health problems 10 years later than those perceiving more neighborhood safety. These findings persisted after adjusting for baseline health, neighborhood income, individual income, and individual sociodemographics. This relation was partially mediated by smoking. Results did not differ by gender, age, or individual SES. Our results indicate a longitudinal relation between feeling unsafe in one's neighborhood and later health problems among men and women representing a wide age and income range. Moreover, our findings support a behavioral pathway through which neighborhood safety perceptions may be linked to health.


2016-08-08

India Human Development Survey-II (IHDS-II), 2011-2012 Tracking and Village Files Now Available


The India Human Development Survey-II (IHDS-II), 2011-2012 collection has been updated with four additional public-use datasets and associated documentation files:

  • Tracking file: Includes information on the location of individuals from IHDS-I (2004-2005) at the time of IHDS-II.
  • Village, Village Panchayat, and Village Respondent files: Contains information about village infrastructure and wage levels, panchayat composition, and the position of individuals who responded to the village questionnaire. 1,410 village modules were completed from the universe of 1,503 villages where IHDS respondents lived.
IHDS-II files previously available for analysis include:

  • Birth History:  Gender, month and year of birth, age, and current location for children birthed to women in the Eligible Women file.
  • Eligible Women:  Gender relations, marital history, number of children birthed and maternity care for women in the household, age 15 to 49.
  • Household:  Sources of income, consumption, land ownership, and standard of living.
  • Individual:  Employment, health, morbidity, and education for individuals in the household.
  • Medical Staff:  Characteristics of staff including position, religion, sex, caste, degree, and years employed.
  • Medical Facilitates:  Facility characteristics, services provided, and medications stocked.
  • Non-Residents:  Information about non-resident family members including relationship, place of residence, marital status, education, and occupation.
  • School Staff:  Characteristics of staff including age, sex, education, religion, and jati.
  • School Facilities:  Information on physical structure, costs to attend, number of students, and management of the school.
  • Wage and Salary:  Includes occupation, industry, days worked in past year, hours worked, payment period, and rate of pay for individuals in the household.
The IHDS is a nationally representative, multi-topic panel survey of households conducted in 1503 villages and 971 urban neighborhoods across India. The IHDS series is comprised of IHDS (ICPSR 22626) and IHDS-II (ICPSR 36151).
 

ICPSR's Summer Undergraduate Interns for 2016 Answer the Question, "Why ICPSR?"

Patricia Martin, University of California at Santa Barbara, working in the Resource Center for Minority Data
I learned about the ICPSR program while searching for summer research programs. Initially I was enthralled by ICPSR’s focus on quantitative data management and processing. My true passion lies with qualitative research because I love to learn about people’s lived experiences. I want to understand the sense of the “why” behind certain phenomena. Although I have a bias for qualitative research, I knew I needed to expand my horizons in research methodology if I wanted to pursue a career in academia. As a rising senior I will be applying for graduate school programs in the fall and I was looking for a summer program that would be conducive to equipping me with a rich and well-rounded experience. ICPSR was the only program to offer the skills and training I was seeking, from data management, to coursework in statistics for social research, and my own independent research project. There is no doubt in my mind that I made the best decision in choosing ICPSR. In the short amount of time I have been an ICPSR intern, I have gained a new level of understanding and built connections not only with my cohort, but the ICPSR staff, summer program faculty and graduate students.


Nicolo Pinchak, Bowling Green State University, working in the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data
Because my university, Bowling Green State University, is a member institution, I was well aware of ICPSR's outstanding reputation across the social sciences. When I heard about their internship for undergraduates involving the Summer Program, I knew the experience would be unparalleled. Exploring other Summer programs only confirmed this – there simply are not other opportunities to be as holistically involved in the quantitative social research process. And the advertized data management techniques, independent research project, and individualized methods courses have only been half the experience. In addition to being paired with a highly supportive faculty member and experienced data processors, we benefit from the presence of each other – other like-minded, eager, aspirational undergraduates interested in social research, graduate school, and research careers.


Austin McKitrick, West Virginia University, working in the National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program
As a double major in biology and psychology, I felt I had a strong background in applied research, but wasn’t sure how to correctly analyze the data in my senior theses. When searching for an internship program for the summer, I was immediately drawn to the ICPSR for their worldwide reputation in quantitative methodology. I found no other program that would give me the opportunity to learn statistical programming from a renowned staff, take rigorous course work alongside PhD candidates and professors from around the world, and work on an independent research project. The engaging environment that the ICPSR has created is one-of-a-kind and I don’t believe I could find anything else like it in a program. As I move on in my career, I know I will take the valuable skills the ICPSR has provided me and utilize them in my future research with discrimination and mental health in minority groups (specifically LGBT+ and ethnic minorities).


Elaine Vilorio, Amherst College, working with the ICPSR Members Archive
The undergraduate internship at ICPSR is unique. I genuinely didn't see anything like it as I applied to different institutions and organizations. At ICPSR, I'm able to learn about data from all sides. We learn how they're collected by engaging with social scientists and survey designers. We learn how data are processed first-hand by processing ourselves. We learn how to analyze data by engaging in our own research project. And just to ensure we have data theory down, we take statistics courses with graduate students and professors in ICPSR's Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research. As someone who comes from social science departments that lack quantitative methodology training, I knew ICPSR was the place for me.



#icpsrinternship



PATH Study Wave 1 Public-Use Files Released

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announce the availability of public-use files (PUF) for the questionnaire data from the first wave of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study. The PATH Study PUF is downloadable from the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR).

The PATH Study is a household-based, nationally representative, longitudinal cohort study of 45,971 youth (12-17 years) and adults in the United States. The study was launched in 2011 to inform FDA’s regulatory activities under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act that was signed into law in 2009. Data in the first wave were collected from September 2013 to December 2014.

To download the wave 1 PUF data and documentation, go to: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36498.

Qualified researchers can request access to the wave 1 PATH Study restricted-use files (RUF). To apply, please follow the information at: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36231.

For more information on the PATH Study, please visit: http://pathstudyinfo.nih.gov.

Please share this information with others who may be interested.

New Releases through 2016-08-07

Below is a list of new data collection additions to the ICPSR data archive along with a list of released data collections that have been updated:

New Additions

Updates


2016-08-04

Career Opportunity in ICPSR for the Director, Resource Center for Minority Data (RCMD)

Project Director/Research Scientist


The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), a center in the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, is recruiting a senior social scientist to direct the Resource Center for Minority Data. We seek an experienced researcher who will engage in outreach and education to the research community, encouraging and supporting data sharing and data use on minority-related issues. We are particularly interested in someone who can expand RCMD's data resources to include administrative and other naturally occurring data and researchers addressing issues related to data access itself, such as the digital divide, or other research areas grounded in data on minorities, including health disparities, poverty and inequality, and minority entrepreneurship. The person selected for this position will hold a research faculty appointment at ICPSR and as well as an appropriate academic unit at the University of Michigan. For a full description please visit umjobs.org

Screening of applications will begin 1 November 2016 and continue until the position is filled. To apply, please submit a cover letter, a CV, relevant writing samples, and contact information for three references to Margaret Levenstein, Director, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research, Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-1248 at rcmd-search@umich.edu.

The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer dedicated to the goal of building a culturally diverse and welcoming university community. Potential applicants who share this goal are encouraged to apply.

2016-08-02

New Findings From the MIDUS Study: Precipitous Dehydroepiandrosterone Declines Reflect Decreased Physical Vitality and Function

New Findings From the MIDUS Study:
Precipitous Dehydroepiandrosterone Declines Reflect Decreased Physical Vitality and Function
Danielle N. Rendina, Carol D. Ryff and Christopher L. Coe
The Journals of Gerontology: Series A
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci (2016)
doi: 10.1093/gerona/glw135
First published online: July 28, 2016
Abstract
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form, DHEA-S, peak in young adulthood and then decrease dramatically with age. However, there is extensive variation in this age-related hormone decline, suggesting an early decrement may be associated with lower vitality and be prognostic of poor health in old age. To determine whether DHEA-S and DHEA are correlated with physical indices of vitality, hormone levels were analyzed with respect to clinical health histories, physical functioning including grip strength, gait speed and repetitive standing, and self-reported chronic pain. The participants (N = 1,214) were 35–86 years of age from a nationally representative survey, Midlife Development in the United States. DHEA-S and DHEA below age-expected levels were associated with more chronic illness conditions and self-reported persistent pain and pain sensitivity upon manual palpation. Additionally, lower DHEA-S and DHEA correlated with poorer performance on tests of physical functioning by middle age suggesting a more precipitous decline is already indicative of reduced vigor and physical strength. When considered with respect to age- and gender-typical norms, larger decrements in DHEA-S and DHEA may be causally related to the loss of physical vitality. Conversely, when hormone secretion is sustained in older adults, it conveys reduced risk for the physical weakness and ailments that precede frailty.


New from NSHAP: All in the family: The link between kin network bridging and cardiovascular risk among older adults

New publication using the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP)
In: Social Science & Medicine
Available online 28 July 2016
All in the family: The link between kin network bridging and cardiovascular risk among older adults *
Alyssa Goldman
doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.07.035
Highlights
• Study examines social network bridging and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk.
• Older adults that bridge kin are ∼65% more likely to present elevated CVD risk.
• This association is unique to bridging kin network members.
• Bridging kin may be linked to greater social strain and less social support.
• This association may be more consequential for women than for men.
Abstract
While considerable work has examined the association between social relationships and health, most of this research focuses on the relevance of social network composition and quality of dyadic ties. In this study, I consider how the social network structures of ties among older adults' close family members may affect cardiovascular health in later life. Using data from 938 older adults that participated in Waves 1 and 2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP), I test whether older adults who occupy bridging positions among otherwise disconnected or poorly connected kin in their personal social network are more likely to present elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker for cardiovascular risk. Results indicate that occupying a bridging position among family members is significantly associated with elevated CRP. This effect is unique to bridging kin network members. These findings suggest that ties among one's closest kin may generate important resources and norms that influence older adults' health, such that bridging kin network members may compromise physical wellbeing. I discuss these results in the context of prior work on social support, family solidarity, and health in later life.
The National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) data is available from NACDA:
Wave 1: Persistent URL: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR20541.v6
Wave 2: Persistent URL: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34921.v1

2016-08-01

New Releases through 2016-07-31

Below is a list of new data collection additions to the ICPSR data archive along with a list of released data collections that have been updated:

New Additions

Updates