2015-11-24

Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE) Disabling Process Study: 2001-2002 (ICPSR 36203)

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Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE) Disabling Process Study: 2001-2002 (ICPSR 36203)

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Summary:
This collection sought to examine relationships among components of the Enabling-Disabling Model as presented in the 1997 Institute of Medicine report, Enabling America: Assessing the Role of Rehabilitation Sciences. The Enabling-Disabling Model includes the following primary components: pathology, impairment, functional limitation, disability, and quality of life. In this model, disability is proposed to be influenced by pathology, impairment, and functional limitation. Disability is also seen as a function of the interaction between the person and the environment. This investigation examined relationships within the Enabling-Disabling Model in a random sample of Mexican American older adults. The specific aims were to: (1) examine the interrelationships among the components of the Enabling-Disabling Model over time in older Mexican-American adults, and (2) use components of the Enabling-Disabling Model to expand our understanding of the natural history of aging and to predict health related quality of life in older Mexican American adults. Data were collected from 621 older adults who were participating in the Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE). Only subjects who were physically capable of safely completing the muscle strength measures were included in the study. Baseline interviews were collected on this subsample in 2001 during Wave 4 (ICPSR 4314) of the larger Hispanic EPESE study. Follow-up data were collected in 2002 from 551 participants. Data were collected on information such as respondents' health status, activities of daily living and ability to perform tasks. Demographic and background information include age, relationship status, gender, marital status and household composition.
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