2013-10-29

Now Available: WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE): Wave 0, 2002-2004




Now Available: WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE): Wave 0, 2002-2004

Summary:
The World Health Organization (WHO)'s Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) is a longitudinal follow-up of a cohort of ageing and older adults. SAGE has been built on the experience and standardized instruments of WHO's 2000/2001 Multi-country Survey Study (MCSS) and the 2002/2004 World Health Surveys (WHS). These surveys focused on health and health-related outcomes and their determinants and impacts in nationally representative samples. These data aim to address data gaps on ageing, adult health and well-being in lower and middle income countries, whilst being comparable to surveys conducted in higher income countries (such as the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), and the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)). One of the major drivers of this effort has been the lack of comparability of self-reported health status in international health surveys due to systematic biases in reporting, despite using similar instruments and attempts at making questions conceptually equivalent in translation. SAGE uses standard instruments developed over the last decade, a common design and training approach with explicit strategies for making data comparable to cover a wide range of issues that directly and indirectly impact health and well-being. The survey methodology and research design has included a number of methods to address methods for detecting and correcting for systematic reporting biases in health interview surveys, including vignette methodologies, objective performance tests and biomarkers. A number of techniques have also been employed to improve data comparability, including using common definitions of concepts, common methods of data collection and translations, rigorous sample design and post hoc harmonization. The 2002-2004 WHS data from six countries (China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia, and South Africa) constitute Wave 0 of WHO's Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE).
(A sample of these respondents were included in the follow-up 2007-2009 SAGE Wave 1 in these six countries, with new respondents added to ensure a nationally representative sample. WAVE 1 data is expected to be released in November of 2013.)
If you have any questions or concerns contact:
Martha Sayre, Manager of the NACDA Program on Aging (msayre@umich.edu)
or
James McNally, Director of the NACDA Program on Aging (jmcnally@umich.edu)

Data Citation

Chatterji, Somnath, and Paul Kowal. WHO Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE): Wave 0, 2002-2004. ICPSR28502-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2013-10-28. doi:10.3886/ICPSR28502.v1
 

2012 Monitoring the Future Released


The National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program (NAHDAP) is pleased to announce the release of the 2012 Monitoring the Future data for the 8th / 10th grade and 12th grade studies. Both studies are now available for download. As normal the Core Data file (Part 0001) of the 12th grade study is available for online analysis through ICPSR's SDA system.

Two exciting changes occurred this year for the 8th / 10th grade study. The first change is the concatenation of the file. Previously the 8th / 10th grade were separated out by grade and the four forms used. Now all eight parts are merged together to create one complete file. This was done in an effort to enhance and simplify analysis. The other change is that the 8th / 10th grade file is now available on the SDA system for the first time.

Since 1976, Monitoring the Future is an annual, national survey sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and conducted by the University of Michigan. Each year nearly 50,000 8th, 10th, and 12th graders complete surveys to explore changes in drug use, educational aspirations and attitudes, personal values and behaviors, and lifestyle orientations of youth across the United States.

More information about Monitoring the Future can be found on their web site.

2013-10-24

Applications now accepted for 2014 ICPSR Summer Internship Program

Applications are being accepted for the 2014 ICPSR Summer Undergraduate Internship Program, an intensive, 10-week program in Ann Arbor, Michigan, for students interested in social science research.

Apply now through the ICPSR online application portal. To complete the application form, students must answer a few questions; upload a cover letter, resume, and list of relevant courses; and provide contact information for two recommending college faculty or staff members, or employer references. The recommendations must be completed through the ICPSR recommendation portal.
The deadline for all materials is January 31, 2014.

To be eligible, a student must:
  • Have an expected graduation of December 2014 or later
  • Be a US citizen or have permanent residency
  • Possess undergraduate standing and have completed sophomore year in a social science or mathematics major, with interests related to one of ICPSR's Thematic Collections
 About the Internship
The NSF-funded Research for Undergraduates (REU) internship program (Grant No. 1062317) matches students with mentors at the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), and supports exploration of a research question from start to finish — including literature searches, data analyses, and creation of conference-ready posters summarizing students' research findings. Interns can attend graduate-level courses in quantitative methods at the University of Michigan taught by leading faculty across various research fields. Additionally, all ICPSR interns learn valuable data-management techniques using statistical packages such as SPSS, Stata, and SAS. Visit our website or view the flyer (PDF, 466 KB) for more information.

For examples of research projects done by past ICPSR interns, please see these videos.

2013-10-22

Archiving NIJ Data at NACJD Webinar Registration

On Wednesday, November 6, 2013, from 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM EDT, the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD) will be offering a webinar on "Archiving NIJ Data at NACJD". This webinar will describe the steps to successfully archive National Institute of Justice-Sponsored Research with the NACJD. The focus will be on describing best practices to assist NIJ grantees in the preparation of their data for use by their own project team and the research community, reviewing the NACJD deposit checklist and guidelines, and viewing a brief demonstration of the resources available through the NACJD website.

Reserve your webinar seat now at: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/496517530. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

NACJD and NIJ are aware of access restrictions that may prevent individuals at the Department of Justice from registering for and participating in the webinar from their individual computers. Arrangements are being made to provide access to the webinar in the Picket Conference Room (Room 7102) at the Department of Justice where access to GoToWebinar is permitted.

Webinar Scheduled on Working with Data from the Pathways to Desistance Study

Join us on November 6, 2013, for a webinar on working with data from the Pathways to Desistance Study.

The goal of the workshop is to expose investigators to the Pathways to Desistance Study and its accompanying data sets.  These data sets contain detailed information on 1,354 serious adolescent offenders followed for seven years after court involvement.  They have relevance for a number of topics related to law and psychology research, including risk assessment, perceptions of the risks of crime, and developmental trends.  The purpose of the webinar is to:

1.  Describe the Pathways to Desistance study methods and sample
2.  Describe the measures used over time
3.  Discuss possible areas of investigation that the Pathways study might be useful for addressing

Specific advice related to the use of these data sets for certain types of analyses will be provided.  

Presenters:        
Robert Choate, University of Michigan, ICPSR
Edward Mulvey, Ph.D; University of Pittsburgh,  Principal Investigator
Carol Schubert, MPH  University of Pittsburgh,  Pathways Study Director

This webinar is free and open to the public. 


Date:    Wednesday, November 6, 2013
Time:    1:00 PM - 2:00 PM EST

Space is limited.
Reserve your Webinar seat now at:
https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/719624530   

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

2013-10-21

Deirdre McCloskey Webinar: Almost Never Use Tests of Statistical Significance -- Use Instead Oomph, the Scrutiny of Substantive Differences

Join us for a Webinar on Monday, October 28, 2:00-3:00 p.m. EDT
No registration required

Visit this webinar link and enter as a Guest.

Existence, arbitrary statistical significance, philosophical possibilities uncalibrated to the sizes of important effects in the world are useless for science. Yet in medical science, in population biology, in much of sociology, political science, psychology, and economics, in parts of literary study, there reigns the spirit of the Mathematics or Philosophy Departments (appropriate in their own fields of absolutes). The result, argues economist Deirdre McCloskey, has been a catastrophe for such sciences, or former sciences. The solution is simple: get back to seeking oomph. It would be wrong, of course, to abandon math or statistics. But they need every time to be put into a context of How Much, as they are in chemistry, in most biology, in history, and in engineering science.

A related interview with McCloskey (PhD, Economics, Harvard) can be found on the ICPSR website.

McCloskey is a Visiting Michigan Institute for Teaching and Research in Economics (MITRE) scholar. This free webinar, sponsored by MITRE, the UM Department of Economics and ICPSR, is open to the public. Please forward this invitation to all with interest.
  • Title: Almost Never Use Tests of Statistical Significance: Use Instead Oomph, the Scrutiny of Substantive Differences
  • Date: Monday, October 28, 2013
  • Time: 2:00-3:00 p.m. EDT
  • No registration is required; visit this webinar link and enter as a Guest.

System Requirement: Recent Web browser
If you have never attended an Adobe Connect webinar before, you can test your connection by clicking on this link.

2013-10-20

NSHAP Wave 2 Data and Updated NSHAP Wave 1 Now Available

Obtaining WAVES 1 and  2 of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) 

The formal release of NSHAP WAVE 2 is now available for interested researchers. This release represents the fully processed Wave 2 data for analysis. The full documentation and a variety of data enhancements are available as part of this study.

Obtaining NSHAP WAVE 2 Data.

For the Wave 2 study, NSHAP returned to Wave 1 respondents and eligible non-interviewed respondents from Wave 1 (Wave 1 Non-Interviewed Respondents). The Wave 2 sample was also extended to include the cohabiting spouses and romantic partners of Wave 1 Respondents and Wave 1 Non-Interviewed Respondents. Partners were considered to be eligible to participate in NSHAP if they resided in the household with Wave 1 Respondent/Wave 1 Non-Interviewed Respondent at the time of the Wave 2 interview and were at least 18 years of age. Wave 1 for further sampling information, as well as the Original P.I. Documentation in the ICPSR Codebook and visit the NORC at the University of Chicago Web site.

Information and codebooks for NSHAP WAVE 2 can be found at this URL:
              http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/studies/20541
This information can also be found at this persistent web address at ICPSR:
               http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34921.v1

The Data Use Agreement and instructions for requesting NSHAP 2 can be found on the NSHAP webpage along with codebooks and supporting documentation.


NSHAP WAVE 1
The data and documentation for NSHAP WAVE 1 has also been updated at this time.

The NSHAP WAVE 1 sample is built on the foundation of the national household screening carried out by the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) in 2004. Through a collaborative agreement, HRS identified households for the NSHAP eligible population. A sample of 4,400 people was selected from the screened households. NSHAP made one selection per household. Ninety-two percent of the persons selected for the NSHAP interview were eligible. For more information on sampling, users should refer to the Original P.I. Documentation in the ICPSR Codebook, as well as visit the NORC at the University of Chicago Web site.

Information and codebooks for NSHAP WAVE 1 can be found at this URL:
             http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/studies/20541
This information can also be found at this persistent web address at ICPSR:
               http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR20541.v6

Thank you for your interest in NSHAP.

Sincerely,

 Dr. James W McNally
 NACDA Director
*
Link for DUA Wave 1

Link for DUA Wave 2

2013-10-18

ICPSR Seeks Director of Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan provides advanced training to students, researchers, and policymakers around the world in its Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research. The distinguished social science educator who serves as Director will lead the Summer Program, with responsibility for recruiting, retaining, and assisting the Program’s outstanding faculty, managing the Program’s professional staff, and overseeing the student experience. This position may be held full time or part time, and it may be combined with other activities at the University of Michigan or at another institution that is a member of ICPSR.

We are seeking nominations of and applications from highly qualified candidates. To apply or make a nomination, or to request further information, please contact George Alter, Director, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research, Institute for Social Research, P.O. Box 1248, Ann Arbor, MI 48016-1248. The University of Michigan is a Non-Discriminatory Affirmative Action Employer.

Learn More

2013-10-11

NAHDAP Announces Student Research Paper Competition

The National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program (NAHDAP) is offering a Research Paper Competition for undergraduates and master's students this year and invites submissions from students and recent graduates at member and nonmember institutions. 

The paper must be on the topic of drug addiction or HIV, and students are encouraged to use these data released by the National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program. The purpose of the competition is to highlight exemplary research papers on topics related to addiction and HIV that are based on quantitative analysis. The awards are $1,000 for first place and $750 for second place in each category, and publication on the ICPSR Research Paper Competition Winners website and in a special edition of the ICPSR Bulletin for the first-place winners.

Visit the ICPSR Research Paper Competition website for details. Deadline for submissions is January 31, 2014.

Read more:


2013-10-10

ICPSR Announces New Student Research Paper Competition

ICPSR is pleased to announce that the National Addiction and HIV Data Archive (NAHDAP) is offering a Research Paper Competition for undergraduates and master's students this year and invites submissions from students and recent graduates at member and nonmember institutions.

The paper must be on the topic of drug addiction or HIV, and students are encouraged to use these data released by the National Addiction and HIV Data Archive Program. The purpose of the competition is to highlight exemplary research papers on topics related to addiction and HIV that are based on quantitative analysis. The awards are $1,000 for first place and $750 for second place in each category, and publication on the ICPSR Research Paper Competition Winners website and in a special edition of the ICPSR Bulletin for the first-place winners.

Visit the ICPSR Research Paper Competition website for details. Deadline for submissions is January 31, 2014.


Read more:

2013-10-03

ICPSR Saddened by Passing of Former Council Chair Ann Wolpert

Ann Wolpert
The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research is saddened to learn of the passing of Ann J. Wolpert, after a brief illness. She had been director of libraries at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 1996 and a leader in the area of digital stewardship.

Wolpert, 70, was a member of the ICPSR Council from 2008-2012 and its Chair from 2010-2012.

"Ann was a great friend and guide for ICPSR," said ICPSR Director George Alter. "As Chair of the ICPSR Council, she was a wonderful mentor to me personally and a model of leadership in academic organizations." 

As director of libraries, she was responsible for the MIT Libraries' five major collections and a number of smaller branch libraries, as well as the MIT Press, according to her biography at MIT. She was active in the professional library community, serving as president of the Association of Research Libraries, as a board member of the Boston Library Consortium, and as a member of the National Institute for Health's Public Access Working group. She also was a frequent writer and speaker, contributing papers on topics including open access and the future of research libraries, library service to remote users, and intellectual property management in a digital environment.

Prior to joining MIT, Wolpert was executive director of library and information services at the Harvard Business School.

Wolpert held a BA from Boston University and an MLS from Simmons College.

Further information can be found on MIT's website.

Northwestern Juvenile Project (NJP) Baseline data now available

The Northwestern Juvenile Project (NJP) Baseline data are now available through NAHDAP. This study took place between 1995 and 1998 with 1,829 juvenile detainees between the ages of 10 and 18 located in Cook County, IL. The purposes of the study were to assess the alcohol, drug, and mental service needs of these youth, to determine how many received services, and to assess how well these needs were met. NJP was sponsored by several organizations including multiple sources at the National Institutes of Health: NIDA, NIMH, and NIAAA.

The Baseline study has 16 data parts. A questionnaire and codebook of the individual parts are available for public download, but the data files are restricted. You may apply for access to the data through the NAHDAP Web site.