2016-08-26

Galveston Bay Recovery Study, 2008-2010 (ICPSR 34801)

The Galveston Bay Recovery Study (GBRS) was designed to study trajectories of wellness after Hurricane Ike hit the Galveston Bay area on September 13, 2008. The sample included adults who were living in Galveston County or Chambers County, Texas at the time of the hurricane, not just those who remained in the area after the hurricane, who may have been less affected by the storm. Three interviews were conducted approximately 2-5, 5-9, and 14-18 months after the hurricane, respectively. Information was obtained on experiences during Hurricane Ike, lifetime traumatic events, and mental health and functioning before and after the hurricane, as well as between survey waves (including assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and suicidality). Demographic variables include race/ethnicity, age, education, marital status, number of children/offspring, income, and employment status.

Persistent URL: 

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2016-08-22

New Releases through 2016-08-21

Below is a list of new data collection additions to the ICPSR data archive along with a list of released data collections that have been updated:

New Additions

Updates


2016-08-16

New Findings From the MIDUS Study: What Explains the Heritability of Completed Fertility? Evidence from Two Large Twin Studies

New Findings From the MIDUS Study:
What Explains the Heritability of Completed Fertility? Evidence from Two Large Twin Studies

In: Behavior Genetics

Daniel A. Briley, Felix C. Tropf, Melinda C. Mills

Original Research: 13 August 2016
DOI: 10.1007/s10519-016-9805-3

Abstract
In modern societies, individual differences in completed fertility are linked with genotypic differences between individuals. Explaining the heritability of completed fertility has been inconclusive, with alternative explanations centering on family formation timing, pursuit of education, or other psychological traits. We use the twin subsample from the Midlife Development in the United States study and the TwinsUK study to examine these issues. In total, 2606 adult twin pairs reported on their completed fertility, age at first birth and marriage, level of education, Big Five personality traits, and cognitive ability. Quantitative genetic Cholesky models were used to partition the variance in completed fertility into genetic and environmental variance that is shared with other phenotypes and residual variance. Genetic influences on completed fertility are strongly related to family formation timing and less strongly, but significantly, with psychological traits. Multivariate models indicate that family formation, demographic, and psychological phenotypes leave no residual genetic variance in completed fertility in either dataset. Results are largely consistent across U.S. and U.K. sociocultural contexts.

Cite this article as:
Briley, D.A., Tropf, F.C. & Mills, M.C. Behav Genet (2016). doi:10.1007/s10519-016-9805-3

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10519-016-9805-3

MIDUS is available from ‪#‎AgingData‬ at NACDA
http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/series/203


New Findings From the MIDUS Study: Culture and Healthy Eating The Role of Independence and Interdependence in the United States and Japan

New Findings From the MIDUS Study: Culture and Healthy Eating- The Role of Independence and Interdependence in the United States and Japan
Cynthia S. Levine, Yuri Miyamoto, Hazel Rose Markus, Attilio Rigotti, Jennifer Morozink Boylan, Jiyoung Park, Shinobu Kitayama, Mayumi Karasawa, Norito Kawakami, Christopher L. Coe, Gayle D. Love, Carol D. Ryff

Published online August 11, 2016, doi: 10.1177/0146167216658645 Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
August 11, 2016 0146167216658645

Abstract Healthy eating is important for physical health. Using large probability samples of middle-aged adults in the United States and Japan, we show that fitting with the culturally normative way of being predicts healthy eating. In the United States, a culture that prioritizes and emphasizes independence, being independent predicts eating a healthy diet (an index of fish, protein, fruit, vegetables, reverse-coded sugared beverages, and reverse-coded high fat meat consumption; Study 1) and not using nonmeat food as a way to cope with stress (Study 2a). In Japan, a culture that prioritizes and emphasizes interdependence, being interdependent predicts eating a healthy diet (Studies 1 and 2b). Furthermore, reflecting the types of agency that are prevalent in each context, these relationships are mediated by autonomy in the United States and positive relations with others in Japan. These findings highlight the importance of understanding cultural differences in shaping healthy behavior and have implications for designing health-promoting interventions. http://psp.sagepub.com/…/20…/08/11/0146167216658645.abstract MIDUS is available from ‪#‎AgingData‬ at NACDA http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NACDA/series/203





2016-08-15

New Releases through 2016-08-14

Below is a list of new data collection additions to the ICPSR data archive along with a list of released data collections that have been updated:

New Additions

Updates


2016-08-12

NACDA Announces the BETA Release: Survey of Midlife Development in Japan (MIDJA 2): Biomarker Project, 2013-2014 (ICPSR 36530)

NACDA Announces the BETA Release:

Survey of Midlife Development in Japan (MIDJA 2): Biomarker Project, 2013-2014 (ICPSR 36530)

Alternate Title: MIDJA 2 Biomarker

Principal Investigator(s): Ryff, Carol D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kawakami, Norito, University of Tokyo; Kitayama, Shinobu, University of Michigan; Karasawa, Mayumi, Tokyo Christian Woman's University; Markus, Hazel, Stanford University; Coe, Christopher, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Summary:

These data are being released in BETA version to facilitate early access to the study for research purposes. This collection has not been fully processed by NACDA or ICPSR at this time, and are released in the format provided by the principal investigators; users can find the data and documentation by clicking the "Other" link under the "Dataset(s), download:" area below. As the study is processed and given enhanced features by ICPSR, users will be contacted and can request the updated versions of the study. Please report any data errors or problems to user support and we will work with you to resolve any data related issues.

In 2008, with funding from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), baseline survey data were collected from a probability sample of Japanese adults (N=1,027) aged 30 to 79 from the Tokyo metropolitan area, resulting in the Survey of Midlife Development in Japan (MIDJA) [ICPSR 30822]. In 2009-2010, biomarker data was obtained from a subset (n=382) of these cases (MIDJA Biomarker) [ICPSR 34969].

The survey and biomarker measures obtained, parallel those in a national longitudinal sample of Americans known as Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) [ICPSR 4652: MIDUS 2 and ICPSR 2760: MIDUS 1]. The central objective was to compare the Japanese sample (MIDJA) with the United States sample (MIDUS) to test hypotheses about the role of psychosocial factors in the health (broadly defined) of mid- and later-life adults in Japan and the United States

In 2012, with additional support from NIA, a longitudinal follow-up of the MIDJA sample was conducted resulting in a second wave (N=657) of survey data (MIDJA 2) [ICPSR 36427].

This collection reflects data from 2013-2014, when a second wave of biomarker data was obtained from a sub-sample (n=328) of those who completed the MIDJA 2 survey. Among this group, about 75 percent (n=243) also completed the first wave of biomarker assessments.

Participants traveled to a clinic on the University of Tokyo campus where biomarker data (vital signs, morphometric assessments, blood assays, and medication data) were obtained. Participants also provided daily saliva samples for cortisol assessment and completed a self-administered medical history questionnaire, as well as a time preference questionnaire.

The medical history questionnaire included assessments of conditions and symptoms, major health and life events, nutrition/diet, and additional psychosocial measures (anxiety, depression, relationship quality, control etc.).

The time preference questionnaire was used to collect respondents' opinions on management of money and assets given hypothetical scenarios.

Demographic variables include age, gender, and marital status.

Series: Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) Series

These data can be obtained from NACDA:
Persistent URL: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36530.v1

Beta Release: Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (HEPESE) Wave 7 available from NACDA

Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (HEPESE) Wave 7, 2010-2011 [Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas] (ICPSR 36537)

Alternate Title:  HEPESE Wave 7
Principal Investigator(s): 
Summary:
These data are being released in BETA version to facilitate early access to the study for research purposes. This collection has not been fully processed by NACDA or ICPSR at this time; the original materials provided by the principal investigator were only converted to other file types for ease of use. As the study is processed and given enhanced features by ICPSR, users will be able to access the updated versions of the study. Please report any data errors or problems to user support and we will work with you to resolve any data related issues.
The Hispanic EPESE provides data on risk factors for mortality and morbidity in Mexican Americans in order to contrast how these factors operate differently in non-Hispanic White Americans, African Americans, and other major ethnic groups.
The Wave 7 dataset comprises the sixth follow-up of the baseline Hispanic EPESE (HISPANIC ESTABLISHED POPULATIONS FOR THE EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES OF THE ELDERLY, 1993-1994: [ARIZONA, CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND TEXAS] [ICPSR 2851]). The baseline Hispanic EPESE collected data on a representative sample of community-dwelling Mexican Americans, aged 65 years and older, residing in the five southwestern states of Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas.
The public-use data cover demographic characteristics (age, sex, type of Hispanic race, income, education, marital status, number of children, employment, and religion), height, weight, social and physical functioning, chronic conditions, related health problems, health habits, self-reported use of dental, hospital, and nursing home services, and depression. Subsequent follow-ups provide a cross-sectional examination of the predictors of mortality, changes in health outcomes, and institutionalization, and other changes in living arrangements, as well as changes in life situations and quality of life issues.
During this 7th Wave (dataset 1), 2010-2011, re-interviews were conducted either in person or by proxy, with 659 of the original respondents. This Wave also includes 419 re-interviews from the additional sample of Mexican Americans aged 75 years and over with higher average-levels of education than those of the surviving cohort who were added in Wave 5, increasing the total number of respondents to 1,078.
The Wave 7 Informant Interviews dataset (dataset 2) includes data which corresponds to the sixth follow-up of the baseline Hispanic EPESE Wave 7 and included re-interviews with 1,078 Mexican Americans aged 80 years and older. During these interviews, participants were asked to provide the name and contact information of the person they are "closer to" or they "depend on the most for help." These INFORMANTS were contacted and interviewed regarding the health, function, social situation, finances, and general well-being of the ongoing Hispanic EPESE respondents. Information was also collected on the informant's health, function, and caregiver responsibilities and burden. This dataset includes information from 925 informants, more than two-thirds of whom were children of the respective respondents.